Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies
Contact
Department Chair:
Greggor Mattson

Administrative Assistant:
Linda Pardee

Department Email:


Phone: (440) 775-8907
Fax: (440) 775-6698

Location:
Rice Hall 117
10 N. Professor St.
Oberlin, OH, 44074

Courses

Courses
 

CLICK HERE FOR SPRING 2017


FALL 2016

Gateway Courses

GSFS courses designated as “gateway” are also “electives.”

GSFS/CAST 100 - Introduction to Comparative American Studies
The course will introduce students to the complexity of American social and cultural formations, with particular emphases on sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and to various methodologies of comparative analysis. Instructor: W. Kozol

GSFS 101 - Introduction to Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies
This course serves as an introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The central objective is to familiarize students with key concepts, theories, and sociopolitical contentions pertaining to intersecting forms of identity, including gender, sexuality, race, nationality, and others. Paying particular attention to how power marks our experiences of human difference, this course examines issues relating to embodiment, gender performance, violence, and oppression. In so doing, it draws from a diverse and interdisciplinary body of feminist and intersectional critiques, enabling students analyses of relevant social, cultural, and political debates in historical and contemporary contexts.  Instructor: C. Barcelos

GSFS/SOCI 203 - Desire to be Modern: Sociology of Sexuality
Sociologists study the social origins of sexuality: how shared beliefs shape what we desire, what is taboo or what shames us. Historical and cross-cultural research illuminates the way modern sexuality transformed systems of dating, marriage, homosexuality, government, economics and racial classification. Following Freud, Foucault, feminist and queer theorists, learn why sociologists are skeptical of essentialist explanations that rely on biology and favor theories that recognize sexuality as a diverse, ever-changing function of cultural institutions.  Instructor: G. Mattson

GSFS 216 - Gender and Publilc Health: Feminist Approaches to Theory and Practice
This course brings public health-the practice of preventing disease and promoting good health within groups of people, from small communities to entire countries-into conversation with gender, sexuality, and feminist studies. Since both are interdisciplinary fields, we will draw on a range of literatures including health policy, epidemiology, education, feminist science studies, and medical sociology as we question stable categories of gender and health. Students will complete self-directed case studies on topics of their choice, which may include topics such as sex education, the medicalization of childbirth, environmental health, HIV/AIDS, substance use and abuse, and sex work. Instructor: C. Barcelos

Gateway CourseS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTs

ENGL 265 - Anglophone Postcolonial Literatures 
An introduction to Anglophone literatures of Africa, South Asia and their diasporas, this course addresses (and historicizes) the politics of their production and reception, focusing particularly on their engagement with the politics of (i) gender and sexuality; (ii) regional and national socio-cultural formations and their ideologies; (iii) resistance and/or conformity with western canons of taste, styles/genres. Postcolonial and feminist theories regarding “marginality”/”location,” “identity”/”experience,” and “alterity”/”difference” constitute important analytic lenses for examining these literatures. Diversity, Post-1900.  Instructor: A. Needham
Cross List Information This course is cross-listed with CMPL 265.

HIST 229 - Gender in Modern Europe, 1789-1989 
This course will examine how gender roles, gender expectations and the opportunities for participation for men and women changed over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. We will be using gender as a way of gaining greater insight into different forms of social and political organization. We will also be using these forms of social and political organization as a way of understanding how ideologies of gender function in diverse contexts. Instructor: A. Sammartino

Capstone Courses

GSFS courses designated as “capstone” are also “electives.”

GSFS/RELG 367 - Theologies of Abortion
This seminar explores a spectrum of theological approaches on abortion from Roe v. Wade to today. Topics to be studied include: the role of extremist religious groups in abortion clinic violence; how Protestant and Catholic pro-life theologies clash over issues of sex and gendered sexuality; debates about the question of when life begins and `fetal personhood; how race shapes pro-choice and pro-life positions in relation to the bodies of religious women of color.  Instructor: M. Kamitsuka

HIST 331 - Race and Sexuality in U.S. History
In 1933, James Weldon Johnson argued that the ‘sex problem’ was deeply rooted in the ‘heart of the race problem.’ This upper-level seminar explores the many different ways in which race and sexuality have interacted with each other throughout American history. Topics include how racism is expressed and maintained through sexual discourses and practices, the relationship between sexuality and race in the construction of identity, and the historical and contemporary legacies of sexual racism today.  Instructor: R. Romano

POLT 309 - Justice
A seminar devoted to a consideration of major classic and modern theories of justice, and their application to contemporary issues such as affirmative action, disability, same-sex marriage, reproductive rights, and economic fairness. A previous course in political theory or constitutional law is recommended but not required. Substantial class participation expected. Notes: Counts towards CAST and GSFS major.  Instructor: H. Hirsch

POLT 336 - Queer Studies & Political Theory
This seminar offers an introduction to a body of queer political thought that critically investigates the dominant liberal ideal of the free and rational subject. The first section focuses on Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault, who have offered the most incisive critiques of this ideal. The section traces the developments of their thinking within recent queer theory through the work of Judith Butler, Wendy Brown, Janet Halley and others. The seminar seeks to investigate what may come beyond liberalism and what are the limits of queer politics. Prerequisite and notes: one course in Political Theory or equivalent. Not recommended for first and second years. Instructor: G. Popa

Feminist Research Methodologies

Feminist Research Methodologies also counts as an elective course.

GSFS 305. Feminist Research Methodologies
This course traces the historical and dialectical impact of feminist epistemologies on disciplines of the social sciences and humanities. We will explore feminist approaches to research practices including oral history, case studies, archival research, visual and literary criticism, survey/content analysis, and fieldwork. Throughout the semester, each student works on an individual research proposal that incorporates interdisciplinary methods and includes a literature review. Prerequisite & Notes Priority given to GSFS majors.  Instructor: K. Miller
Consent of instructor is required. Contact the Director of GSFS: Greggor Mattson

Elective Courses

GSFS/RELG 108 - Introduction to Religion: Women and the Western Traditions
An introduction to Judaism, Christianity and Islam that focuses on women’s experiences and gender roles. This course will examine representations of women in sacred texts; primary sources by and about women from various historical periods, and contemporary feminist voices within each religious tradition. Topics to be investigated include: rabbinic teachings on biblical women, the role of women in early Christian heretical movements, discourses of the veil in Islam.  Instructor: M. Kamitsuka

Elective Courses in other departments

AAST 347 - Culture, History, and Identity 
This course serves as introduction to Caribbean Literature. Students will examine a wide range of texts that exemplify the beginning and evolution of a literary tradition that is located on a continuum of African Diasporic Literatures. Our discussion will engage the historical, political, and cultural contexts out of which Caribbean Literature has emerged, particularly struggles against colonialism, neocolonialism, sexism, and global capitalism. Some authors discussed are Michelle Cliff, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, and Nalo Hopkinson. Instructor: M. Gadsby

ANTH 237 - Social Mirrors: Race, Class, and Sexuality in Popular Music
This course will examine how music cultures are used as constructive tools to address racial and class marginalization, and how they inform representations of gender and sexuality. Reggae and hip-hop are used as case studies. Through this exploration, students will also analyze how music and performance might impact listners through contradicting ways. For example: providing a sence of esteem and empowerment, but perhaps also perpetuating gender and racial stereotypes, and violence. As an overarching theme, the course will concider the ways in which popular cultural forms are reflections of society at large and, therefore, microcosms through which to interpret it. Instructor: Sabia Mcoy-Torres

ANTH 353 - Culture Theory
A critical examination of theories and debates in the study of culture since the nineteenth century. Topics include: evolutionism, functionalism, symbolic anthropology, structuralism, political economy, feminist and postcolonial critique, and postmodernism. We explore the historical context, legacies, and utility of each approach for theorizing: agency, structure, power, knowledge, culture, subjectivity, and the politics of representation. We consider the consequences of theoretical assumptions for the collection, interpretation, and presentation of ethnographic data. Instructor: C. Biruk

CAST 211 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Identities
This course examines the production of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer identities in the United States as they intersect with important social markers such as race, class, gender, and nation. Situating specific case studies in historical, social, and comparative context, we explore issues such as the intersection of racial and sexual sciences, processes of community formation, the politics of embodiment, social justice movements and queer cultural productions. Instructor: E. Heiliger

CAST 217 - Introduction to Feminist Science Studies
This course investigates the scientific production of race, gender, and sexuality, particularly in the biosciences. We will consider such questions as: What is objectivity and why does it matter to scientific research? How do cultural assumptions about race, gender, sexuality, and the body shape scientific knowledge production in different historical periods? Sources include theories and critiques of science, historical and contemporary science publications, and the Science section of the NY Times. Instructor: E. Heiliger

CMPL 202 - Women, Sex, Taboos ME Cine & lit.
This course examines the ways creative women in the contemporary Middle East have learned to rebel against the social discourses that reinforce their silence, control their behavior, and regulate their sexuality. Through novels, short stories, poems, graphic novels, and films from Egypt, Lebanon, Iran, and Saudi Arabia, we explore literary, visual, and cinematic expressions of women’s subjectivity and agency in contexts of cultural constraint and outright negation. Emphasis will be placed on how Middle Eastern women have broken taboos on silence and violence and reclaimed their sexuality, so often cloaked in shame and dishonor. Instructor: J. Assaad

EAST 206 - Modern Chinese Literature and Film: The Art of Adaptation
This course studies Chinese film-fiction adaptation from 1984-2012 both as an aesthetic interaction between the literary and the cinematic and as a political negotiation between artists and the state. Authors and directors to include are Eileen Chang, Su Tong, Mo Yan, Stanley Kwan, Zhang Yimou, Hou Xiaoxian and others. Instructor: H. Deppman

ENGL 360 - Globalization and Diaspora
This course will develop critical frameworks for reading and writing about globalization and diaspora in literature. What does globalization look like from different disciplinary, historical, and geographic perspectives? How might we access and think about the complex workings of the global economy through narrative and the imagination? This course will demand a sustained inquiry into the cultural and political projects that emerge from, participate in, and critique the effects of transnational capital. In the second half of the class, we home in on the catagory of diaspora to better understand how it enables us to think critically about globalization. American, Diversity, Post-1900. Instructor: H. Suarez

FREN 445 - From the Harem to Hip-Hop: Can the veil be French?
“Liberating” women from the veil was part of the “mission civilisatrice” the French used to justify colonization. Today, about one thousand women are believed to wear the full-face veil in France, a country with a Muslim population of six million. And yet, the burqa is banned in public spaces. We will consider why many view the Islamic headscarf as incompatible with French values and examine what contemporary Muslim artists are doing to challenge this idea. Taught in French. Instructor: A. Barbo

FYSP 039 - Women Behaving Badly
This course will ask broader questions about how and why women violated the law or transgressed during the nineteenth century. We will study the lives of women across a spectrum of racial, class, and ethnic identities to understand the meanings of their legal violations and social transgressions. As a First-Year Seminar, this course is designed to introduce students to an interdisciplinary approach to critical thinking and writing. Instructor: T. Nunley

FYSP 066 - Jane Austen Then and Now
This course approaches Austen’s work formally, historically, and culturally. It studies how Austen revolutionized the form of the novel. It engages with the thematic preoccupations of her novels: class, courtship, domesticity, manners, morality, friendship, gossip. Drawing from secondary materials, it places Austen’s work in the context of the eighteenth century. With film adaptations and reception history, it views Austen as a cultural phenomenon, spanning academic and popular imaginations. Instructor: L. Baudot

FYSP 076 - The Privileged and the Marginalized
This seminar will examine the American college experience in the context of history and culture with a particular emphasis on investigating the gap between privilege and marginalization. The course is comprised of reading and discussion on the overall history of American higher education, including actual college experiences of people from different backgrounds. This seminar will also view privilege and marginalization through different lenses, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, religion, and disability. Instructor: S. Kawaguchi

FYSP 134 - Crossing Borders
In Western cultures, identity has tended to be defined in binary terms: an individual is either black or white, male or female, straight or gay, and so on. This seminar will seek to explore the nature of identity by focusing on fiction, essays, and films in which categories of identity - specifically those of race, gender and sexuality - are represented as fluid and ambiguous rather than as fixed and polarized.  Instructor: D. Walker

FYSP 163 - She Works Hard for the Money
Current U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports indicate that women in the U.S. who are employed full-time earn 80.2% of what men who are employed full-time earn. In this course, we will explore the causes and consequences of gender based wage discrepancy. Topics to be covered include: occupational segregation, comparable worth, shift work, ‘the Mommy Track’, gender based job queuing, career trends, unpaid labor, and globalization. In addition to class reading, each student will choose an occupation and research it throughout the semester. Instructor: D. John

HISP 401 - Tango
This is an optional two-credit course allowing students enrolled in Prof. Cara’s HISP/CMPL 410 to read, discuss and write about primary and critical material in Spanish. One-hour discussion section. Prerequisite & Notes: Only open to students enrolled in HISP/COMPL 410. HISP 304 or the equivalent. Instructor: A. Cara

HIST 270 - Latina/o History
What historical forces have brought together diverse groups including Chicanos from Los Angeles, Cubans from Miami, and Dominicans and Puerto Ricans from New York City? From the 16th century to the present, we map the varied terrains of Latina/o history. Major themes include: conquest and resistance, immigration, work, and the creation of racial and sexual differences within and between Latino/a communities. We survey Latina/o writers from Cabeza de Vaca to Jose Marti to Gloria Anzaldua.  Instructor: Staff

POLT 206 - The Politics of Sexual Minority Communities
This course examines the history and politics of LGBT communities in the United States during the twentieth century. No background in the subject is required, though a general knowledge of American history and politics during this period is helpful. Topics include the relative freedom of urban LGBT communities before and during World War II, the repression of the 1950’s, the Stonewall Rebellion and its aftermath, the politics of AIDS, and the place of LGBT issues in the African-American community. Class participation is essential and is a component of each student’s grade. Notes: Counts for CAST major. Instructor: H. Hirsch

POLT 271 - Gender, Sexuality and the Law
This course will consider some of the historical, theoretical, and doctrinal issues surrounding sexuality and gender in American law. A previous course on constitutional law is helpful but not required. Topics include sexual privacy, military exclusions and the construction of manhood, gender and sexuality in the workplace and in education, sexual consent, and various topics in family law. Class participation is essential and is a component of each student’s grade. Prerequisite & Notes: Counts for CAST major. Instructor: H. Hirsch

RELG 153 – Introduction to Religion: Purity and Pollution
The concepts of purity and impurity are important to much religious thought and affect the basics of daily life in
profound ways, even as they can confound or even infuriate contemporary observers. In this course, we will
focus on three sites of potential pollution: the body, food, and the land. We will also examine ways in which these
concepts remain operative, both explicitly and implicitly, in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  Instructor: R. Epstein-Levi

RHET 205 - Rhetorics of Gender Non-Conformity
Meant for sophomores, juniors, and seniors who wish to continue developing academic skills stressed in First Year Seminars (critical reading, writing, and research). Course members will examine how artistic, activist, journalistic, and historiographic rhetorics are used in film and television to portray transgender and gender non-conforming people. Materials and assignments will be rooted in an intersectional approach including diverse perspectives of economic class, race, ability, nationality, regionality, and religion. Students will work on a variety of multimodal writing tasks, including essays and scripting for audio, video or public exhibition. Instructor: J. Cooper


SPRING 2017

Gateway courses indicated by a (G)
Capstone courses indicated by a (c)
elective courses indicated by an (e)

GSFS/CAST 100 (G) - Introduction to Comparative American Studies
The course will introduce students to the complexity of American social and cultural formations, with particular emphasis on sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and gender, and to various methodologies of comparative analysis.  Instructor: S. Lee

GSFS 101 (G) - Introduction to Gender, Sexuality & Feminist Studies
This course serves as an introduction to Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. The central objective is to familiarize students with key concepts, theories, and sociopolitical contentions pertaining to intersecting forms of identity, including gender, sexuality, race, nationality, and others. Paying particular attention to how power marks our experiences of human difference, this course examines issues relating to embodiment, gender performance, violence, and oppression. In so doing, it draws from a diverse and interdisciplinary body of feminist and intersectional critiques, enabling students analyses of relevant social, cultural, and political debates in historical and contemporary contexts.  Instructor: K. Miller

GSFS/CAST 201 (E) - Latinas/os in Comparative Perspective
This course analyzes the varied experiences of Latinas/os in the United States. Using ethnography, literature, film, and history, this course will explore questions of immigration/transnationalism; culture and political economy; racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual identities among Latinas/os; the struggle for place in American cities; as well as the intersections of gender, work and family. Instructor: G. Perez

GSFS/CAST 202 (E) - Visible Bodies and the Politics of Sexuality
This course considers how visual culture produces and contests concepts of sexuality in American society. We will analyze how mainstream culture universalizes certain experiences of gender and sexuality, as they are inflected by race, ethnicity, class and nationalism, as well as how marginalized groups have used visual representation to contest and subvert these hegemonic ideals. Through case studies, we will explore concepts such as the gaze, spectacle, and agency.  Instructor: W. Kozol

GSFS/CAST 217 (G) - Sexual & Reproductive Justice
This course is an interdisciplinary approach to studying sexual and reproductive politics that draws on sociology, gender and sexuality studies, public health, and public policy. Our key objectives are to identify how racism, classism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia and other forms of social oppression shape the social experience of sexuality and reproduction, as well as to explore how social movements have engaged with these issues. We’ll cover topics including sexual health education, queer and trans inclusion in reproductive justice, sex workers’ rights, the criminalization of pregnancy, access to reproductive health services, and other topics to be determined by student interests. Instructor: C. Barcelos

GSFS/CAST 235 (E) - Debating Citizenships
Americans have long hailed innovations in media technologies as democratic spaces even as commentators criticize popular culture for sustaining normative ideals of citizenship. This interdisciplinary course explores popular media from the radio to the Internet as formative sites for contested ideals of citizenship, with particular attention to changing notions of gender, sexuality, race, ability, and class. We will examine the intersections of popular culture and legal discourse to address issues of belonging, visibility, and marginalization. Instructor: W. Kozol

GSFS/RELG 237 (E) - Gender and Sexuality in Indian Religions
From the erotic asceticism of the god Siva to the auspicious power of a married woman, the nexus of gender and sexuality has broadly shaped the practices and philosophies of South Asia’s many religious traditions. The central questions guiding this course are: How do Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam incorporate sexual practice and/or restraint into a vision of ethical life? When does one’s gender become dangerous or unethical, In pursuing these questions, students will gain a deep familiarity with South Asian asceticism, the place of erotics within religious discourse, new perspectives on queer and transgender theories, emic feminisms, and sexual ethics. Instructor: S. Pierce Taylor

GSFS/RELG 263 (G) - Roots of Religious Feminism
This course analyzes the religious views underpinning women’s literature, political advocacy, public speaking, and social reform work from colonial days to the 1970s, with a focus on primary sources. Students will apply the knowledge and methods acquired during the course to pursue their own research interests in women’s religious history in North America. No previous study of religion, U.S. history, or gender theory is necessary. Instructor: M. Kamitsuka

GSFS/CAST 267 (E) - Nature Sexualized Identities
Interdisciplinary course that re-examines nature, gender, race, queerness, and sexualized identities as they shape, and are shaped by, sustainability, health, and environmental justice concerns. Working from the premise that sexual(ized) identities are at least partially socially constructed. The course also interrogates ways that sexual identities and ideas about nature have co-evolved through science and media. Theories, methodologies and case studies primarily from the Americas. All students welcome.  Instructor: E. Heiliger

GSFS/POLT 306 (C) - Gender and Migration
This course offers an intensive analysis of the gendered dimensions of US immigration politics and policy through an examination of the specific experiences of women migrants. Using a combination of migration theory and intersectional feminist theory, we analyze historical trends that have lead to an increase in the number of women migrants, including globalization, neoliberal trade agreements, and changes in the US political landscape. We also examine gender-specific labor issues, gendered violence, and forced migration.  Instructor: K. Miller

GSFS 316 (E) - Queering Sex Education
Despite the shift away from “abstinence only until marriage,” scholars argue that sex education remains heteronormative, disregards pleasure, constructs sex as dangerous, reproduces racism, and neglects the experiences of trans and gender-nonconforming people. This course situates sex education in historical and contemporary context by tracing its discursive production and envisioning a queering of content and practice. What might it mean to “queer” sex education and what would a queer sex education look like? We will utilize theoretical interventions from critical education studies, queer theory, and trans/gender studies, and engage in action-based course projects such as curricula design and implementation.  Instructor: C. Barcelos

GSFS 339 / SOCI 338 (C) - Prostitution and Social Control: Governing Loose Women
Prostitution is a site of easy truths and inevitable conflict because of cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, ethnicity and citizenship. We probe these intersecting meanings by reviewing the wide range of empirical meanings attributed to prostitution and the ways modern forces have transformed them, especially the state. Taking cues from Michel Foucault, we analyze why recent legal solutions cannot fulfill expectations and discuss how the social control of prostitution might actually cause it.  Instructor: G. Mattson

GSFS 400 (C) - Senior Capstone
This non-credit course represents the capstone requirement for the major in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. It can be fulfilled by enrolling in and passing an appropriate course in another department as articulated in the description of the major.  Instructor: G. Mattson

GSFS 416 (C) - Feminist Epidemiology
This course examines how foundational elements of epidemiology-person, place, and time-are implicated in feminist concerns of power and social justice. We’ll study basic concepts in epidemiological practice, such as calculating incidence rates and designing cohort studies, alongside the history of epidemiology, lay studies or “people’s epidemiology,” activism surrounding population health, and the gendered politics of public health practice. Students will learn to critique epidemiological research with a critical feminist lens, understand the relevance of feminist epidemiology in their own lives and communities, and gain basic skills for designing feminist population health research. Instructor: C. Barcelos


CAST Comparative American Studies

CAST/GSFS 100 (G) - Introduction to Comparative American Studies 

CAST/GSFS 201 (E) - Latinas/os Comparative Perspective 

CAST/GSFS 202 (E) - Visible Bodies

CAST/GSFS 235 (E) - Debating Citizenships

CAST/GSFS 267 (E) - Nature Sexualized Identities

CAST 333 (C) - Trans*Gender Studies 
This course considers the emergence and development of Trans*gender Studies, focusing primarily on gender and sexual minorities of all racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States. We will examine the connections between this academic project and the Trans*gender social movement as well as their transnational counterparts. Reading and discussion includes substantial attention to methods of inquiry that analyze cultural differences as they apply to racialized gender and sexualized difference. Prerequisites: CAST 211 or consent of instructor. Instructor: E. Heiliger

CAST 447 (E) - Queer Positions
When queer is a verb, what does it mean? This course explores key issues in the field of queer theory, including the relationship of sex, gender, race, class, and ability; critiques of liberalism and multiculturalism; normativity and resistance; representation and cultural production; and the politics of time and space. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between theory and practice in order to explore different approaches to social change. Prerequisite & Notes: Prior coursework in CAST or a related field strongly recommended. Instructor: E. Heiliger


CMPL Comparative Literature

CMPL 202 (E) - Women, Sex, Taboos ME Cine & Lit
This course examines the ways creative women in the contemporary Middle East have learned to rebel against the social discourses that reinforce their silence, control their behavior, and regulate their sexuality. Through novels, short stories, poems, graphic novels, and films from Egypt, Lebanon, Iran, and Saudi Arabia, we explore literary, visual, and cinematic expressions of women’s subjectivity and agency in contexts of cultural constraint and outright negation. Emphasis will be placed on how Middle Eastern women have broken taboos on silence and violence and reclaimed their sexuality, so often cloaked in shame and dishonor. Instructor: J. Assaad

CMPL 203 (E) - Polycentric Modernism
It is often said that Modernism ends by the mid-20th century, but this course challenges that periodization, for isn’t it Eurocentric to announce the end of modernism just as postcolonial countries start exploring their own modernities? Comparing Western and (post-)colonial literatures from Herman Hesse and Ingmar Bergman to Waguih Ghaly and Ousmane Sembène, from Virginia Woolf to Jamaica Kincaid, and Marguerite Duras to Clarice Lispector, we will problematize the cartography of modernism, explore the role of gender, and examine how (post-)colonial aesthetics rewrite political and cultural histories to adapt to the inevitable pluralities of our hybrid world. Instructor: J. Assaad


DANC Dance

DANC 375 (E) - Feminist Ethnography
This course explores transnational feminist epistemologies alongside performance studies research methods, investigating the impact of a feminist approach to ethnography in performance studies, and the opportunities afforded by performance analysis to a feminist ethnographic practice. Texts exemplifying feminist ethnographic methods in dance and performance studies explore intercontinental connections and themes based on media, geography, and collective aesthetic and political impulses. Case studies cover topics addressed by feminist artists in their work (ritual, motherhood, gaze theory, sexual violence, lesbian identity, war, among others). Instructor: M. De la Cruz


ENGL English

ENGL 379 (G) - Welfare Queens and Tiger Moms: Narratives of the Maternal
This course reads the cultural politics of the maternal in contemporary American literature. It explores, in particular, the role that the maternal occupies within narratives of migration, nationalism, and globalization. It analyzes how categories like race, gender, sexuality, and class infuse meaning into the maternal - to whom we ascribe maternal roles; how labor (reproductive and productive) manages and is managed by the maternal; and the significance of the nuclear family unit and its alternatives. Rather than asking us to make claims about maternal figures in our own lives, the course demands distance - an alienating gesture that enables a critical knowledge. American, Diversity, Post-1900. Instructor: H. Suarez

ENGL 385 (E) - Women in/and Bollywood
This course will examine how gender and sexuality, especially as they relate to women, are represented in “Bollywood’ cinema. Focusing on individual films, it will analyze: 1) their cinematic techniques and narrative forms for representing women and addressing issues of gender and sexuality (which identities are privileged, which marginalized? what values structure the film’s diegetic world?); and (2) spectatorial address (what sort of gendered, classed, and caste-marked viewer constitutes the film’s desired audience?). Anglo-American and Indian film scholarship – some deriving from feminist and queer studies – and scholarship relevant to the films’ historical and cultural contexts will inform our discussion. Diversity, Post-1900. Instructor: A. Needham


FREN French

FREN 312 (C) - In Search of Lost Women
Through a case study of the figure of the prostitute, students examine the discourses, media, practices, and spatial configurations through which gendered social identities were constructed in 19th century France. Student teams conduct research on subtopics and craft online exhibits. Skills developed include textual and visual analysis, translation, project management, digital presentation, and short-form writing for web publication. Historical readings, museum visits, and collaboration with SOCI 338. In French except for joint sessions with SOCI.  Instructor: E. Murphy

FREN 422 (E) - Women Writers of the Francophone World
This course explores the political and intellectual influence of women writers in shaping the cultural landscape of the Francophone world. From the salonnieres (Madame de Tencin), and pamphleteers (Olympe de Gouges) of the 18th century to the essayists (Simone de Beauvoir), novelists (Ananda Devi), and activists (Ni putes ni soumises) of the 20th and 21st century, French and Francophone women writers have taken up the pen to address major issues of their times. Taught in French. Instructor: P. Leelah


HIST History

HIST 141 (G) - The History of  Women in the U.S.to 1865
The History of Women in the U.S. to 1865 is designed to introduce students to the experiences of women across ethnicity, race, and class from the pre-colonial era to the American Civil War. Through a survey of historical scholarship, as well as primary documents and objects, students will be positioned to contextualize the development of ideas about gender. Students will examine the role of gender in American law, sexuality, aesthetics, ideas about womanhood, the private lives of individual women as well as the coalitions that took shape in women’s organizing to critically evaluate how women shaped US history. Instructor: T. Nunley

HIST 276 (E) - Slavery in Latin America
The course offers a survey of the history of enslavement in Latin America. For more than 300 years, European colonizers exploited Indigenous people and people of African descent through slavery and other coercive labor systems, such as mita/encomienda and repartimiento. Slavery and coerced labor had long-lasting effects on the family, political organization, and cultural practices. It also generated tremendous wealth and cultivated prestige for colonizers and European monarchs. However, resistance movements fought against Spanish and Portuguese oppression and enslaved people escaped, formed their own communities, or disrupted economies to establish their agency in the colonial order.  Instructor: D. Terrazas Williams

HIST 324 (E) - La Mujer: Latina Women in US History
This course will explore the multifaceted experiences, perspectives, and histories of Latina women in the United States. We will first begin with a historical overview of Third World womyn’s activism in the U.S., tracing out the emergence of Latina feminist epistemologies. A key aim of this course will be to understand how categories of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and national status (ie “legality”) are informed by and practiced within everyday lived experiences and through the domains of: family life, employment, religion/spirituality, education, political activism and/or the “body.” Instructor: I. Garza

HIST 347 (E) - African Diaspora in Latin America
This course explores the contributions of Africans and their descendants in the shaping of national identity, political culture, economic development, and cultural expression in contemporary Latin America. With an emphasis on social justice issues and gender, the course engages with rich primary and secondary sources, including documentaries, material culture, and musical artifacts, to offer a dynamic history of the African Diaspora in Brazil and Colombia but also in lesser-studied areas, such as Mexico and Argentina. Prerequisites and notes: Instructor: D. Terrazas Williams

HIST 444 (E) - Gender, Marriage, and Kinship in China
A colloquium exploring the construction of gender, varieties of marriage, and conceptions of family in China from imperial times to the present. Special attention will be paid to the state’s attempts to shape ideals and enforce norms in these areas, along with the response of various groups in the society to those efforts.  Instructor: D. Kelley

HIST 494 (E) - American AIDS 
An An historical analysis of AIDS in the United States, from 1981 to the present. Particular attention is paid to the epidemic ‘s immediate impact, political mobilization and response, and cultural expressions. Instructor: C. Koppes


POLT Politics

POLT 206 (C) - The Politics of Sexual Minority Communities
This course examines the history and politics of LGBT communities in the United States during the twentieth century. No background in the subject is required, though a general knowledge of American history and politics during this period is helpful. Topics include the relative freedom of urban LGBT communities before and during World War II, the repression of the 1950’s, the Stonewall Rebellion and its aftermath, the politics of AIDS, and the place of LGBT issues in the African-American community. Class participation is essential and is a component of each student’s grade. Notes: Counts for CAST major. Instructor: H. Hirsch

POLT 230 (G) - Feminist Theory
This course proposes a survey of feminist theory through the lens of emotions. Because emotions are a key site to understand how political power operates, we will engage in a genealogy of feminist rhetoric and activism. The first section of the course is an introduction to contemporary feminist and queer theory. The second section surveys authors such as Wollstonecraft, Mill, Engels, and the Milan Bookstore Collective. We will ask how these historical figures and groups are relevant to us.  Instructor: G. Popa

POLT/GSFS 306 (C) - Gender and Migration


RELG Relgion

RELG 130 (E) - Love, Passion and Pain: Devotion in Indian Religions
This course follows the spread of religious devotionalism across Hinduism, Islam, and Sikhism. The idea of devotion in motion also allows us to consider the ways in which similar forms of poetry, language, ritual and practice came to animate a range of religious traditions in South Asia. As we will see, devotionalism does not belong to a single tradition, but appears across religions as a disposition that transcends them all. Beyond the three religious traditions that form our focus, students can expect to become familiar with broader themes in the study of religion including canonization, ritual, and sanctification. Instructor: S. Pierce Taylor

RELG/GSFS 237 (E) - Gender Sexuality Indian Religions

RELG/GSFS 263 (G) - Roots of Religious Feminism

RELG 357 (E) – Jewish Sexual Ethics
How have different streams of Jewish tradition grappled with questions of sexual ethics? This course will examine ways the Jewish tradition has grappled with sexuality, and the roles sex and sexuality have played in situating Jews in the broader world and in situating groups of people within Judaism itself. We will also engage a set of particular questions that animate contemporary discussions of sexual morality, including menstrual regulations, homosexuality, premarital sexuality, and sexual health. Instructor: R. Epstein-Levi


OTHER POTENTIAL COURSES OF INTEREST:

ATHL 124 - Women's Fitness
This class is an introductory general fitness class for women. Students will be taught a variety of different methods of cardio and strength training in a different setting each week. Principles and benefits of cross training will be addressed through participation in a wide variety of activities in the gym, outside, in the pool and on the climbing wall. Instructor: E. Rau

ATHL 180 - Basic Self Defense for Women
This course teaches the Rape Aggression Defense System (RAD), which is a program of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques. The RAD system is a comprehensive course for women that begin with awareness, prevention, risk reduction and avoidance while progressing onto the basics of hands on defense training. The class will include lectures of awareness, demonstrations of techniques, options of escape and full contact simulation. Instructor: R. Gresco

ATHL 181 - Advanced Self Defense for Women
Advanced self defense skills. Instructor: R. Gresco