History

Carol Lasser

Carol Lasser

Professor of History

Contact Information

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Office:
Rice Hall 315
(440) 775-6712

Personal Office Hours:
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Carol Lasser

Carol Lasser

Educational Background

  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Pennsylvania, 1973
  • Master of Arts, Harvard University, 1975
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Harvard University, 1982


Professor Lasser has written widely on women and gender in nineteenth-century America. Her publications include: Educating Men and Women Together: Coeducation in a Changing World (1987); Friends and Sisters: Letters between Lucy Stone and Antoinette Brown Blackwell, 1846-1893 (Coeditor, with Marlene D. Merrill, 1987);  "Performing Abolition: African American Women at Antebellum Oberlin and the Quest for Emancipation,” in Kathryn Kish Sklar and James Brewer Stewart, eds Women’s Rights and Transatlantic Antislavery in the Era of Emancipation (Yale University Press, 2007); and “Voyeuristic Abolitionism: Sex, Gender and the Transformation of Antislavery Discourse,” in  Journal of the Early Republic, 28 (Spring 2008). She is completing, with Stacey Robertson, Antebellum American Women: Private, Public, Political  under contract with Rowman and Littlefield.   

 

She has worked with Gary Kornblith as editor of the Textbooks and Teaching  section of the Journal of American History; a selection of articles from this endeavor is appearing as Teaching American History: Essays Adapted from the Journal of American History, 2001-2007 (Boston Bedford/ St. Martin’s, 2008).  Also with Gary Kornblith, she is working on Elusive Utopia: A History of Race in Oberlin, Ohio, a book manuscript in progress.

 

Professor Lasser director of OCEAN: the Oberlin College Enrollment Alliance Network (www.oberlin.edu/ocean), a concurrent enrollment partnership between Oberlin and selected high schools to develop and teach college-level courses. She has also served as an evaluator for Teaching American History grants funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

 

 

 


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