Rhetoric and Composition
Contact
Department Chair:
Laurie McMillin

Administrative Assistant:
Linda Pardee

Department Email:


Phone: (440) 775-8907
Fax: (440) 775-8619

Location:
King Building 139
10 N. Professor St.
Oberlin, OH, 44074

RHET Courses 2013-2014

RHET Courses 2013-2014
 

FALL 2013

Writing Courses for First-and Second-Year Students

For first- or second-year students seeking an introduction to college writing. These courses focus on a variety of topics, but they all offer substantial attention to the process of writing and to critical thinking and reading. Many sections are interdisciplinary and employ a workshop/discussion format. Especially recommended for first- and second-year students who do not feel prepared to take other Writing Certification or Writing Intensive courses across the curriculum.

  • RHET 101 - Entering Discourse Communities: Writing for College and Beyond
    This course aims to form a writer’s community that will explore the various discourses in which class members participate. We will approach writing as real communication among group members rather than artificial practicing of skills. The course will include readings on writing processes as well as essays on varied topics. There will be weekly writing assignments and regular conferences with the instructor to review drafts and revisions. Most classes will be peer response workshops.  Instructor: L. Podis
  • RHET 105 (-01 & -02) - Writing to Learn & Participate
    This course is about writing to accomplish something. Class activities emphasize strategies used in college papers and how non-academic writing requires similar skills in research, argument, and composition. Students write weekly drafts of several short papers, which are workshopped in class meetings and discussed in individual appointments with the instructor.  Instructor: J. Cooper
  • RHET 106 - Journalism Basics
    This course will cover basic reporting, news and features writing, and ethics in journalism. In addition to course writing assignments, students will be encouraged to produce articles for student and local publications.  Instructor: F. Protzman

Writing Courses for Students Beyond the First Year

Rhetoric and Composition courses at the 200-level are intended for students beyond the first year who are interested in improving their writing skills. Issues in disciplinary discourses and composing and revising for a range of writing tasks are emphasized through frequent writing assignments, class discussions, and writing workshops. First-year students may enroll in these courses only by special consent of the instructor.

  • RHET 401 - Teaching and Tutoring Writing Across the Disciplines
    A course in which students will tutor at the writing center or assist one of the writing-intensive courses offered in various disciplines while studying composition theory and pedagogy. In the process of helping to educate others, students work toward a fuller understanding of their own educational experiences, particularly in writing.  Instructor: L. McMillin

Practica

These courses offer students a chance to gain practical experience in writing either by working with an approved student publication or by developing a grant or fellowship application.

  • RTCP 107 - Practicum in Journalism
    Through this course students earn academic credit working for an approved journalistic publication on campus. The course does not meet as a class, but students are expected to attend all required staff meetings and fulfill the assignments made by their editors. Students can earn a maximum of four hours credit toward graduation (a maximum of six hours credit for editors).  Instructor: J. Cooper
  • RTCP 307 - Application Writing
    This course will offer practice in the skills necessary for the challenging, frustrating, specialized (but necessary and rewarding!) work inherent to the process of applying. It will offer advice about stages of the application process–from research, to preparing documents like resumes and personal statements, to preparing for an interview. It will be most useful for those who have just begun to consider job, award, or internship applications. P/NP grading.  Instructor: N. Petzak

SPRING 2013

Writing Courses for First-and Second-Year Students

For first- or second-year students seeking an introduction to college writing. These courses focus on a variety of topics, but they all offer substantial attention to the process of writing and to critical thinking and reading. Many sections are interdisciplinary and employ a workshop/discussion format. Especially recommended for first- and second-year students who do not feel prepared to take other Writing Certification or Writing Intensive courses across the curriculum.

  • RHET 102 - Writing for College and Beyond
    This course will immerse students in the practice of writing for college and beyond. Students will explore a number of forms, analyze and create arguments, work with sources, and develop greater flexibility and ease in their writing. Instructor: L. McMillin
  • RHET 103 (-01 & -02) - College Writing: Motives and Methods
    In this course students explore their writing processes, learn how to read more critically, write in a variety of forms and develop research skills. The class serves as a writing community in which to discuss essays and writing strategies and share written work. Assignments are designed to challenge students and involve them in the kinds of reading, writing, and research that will serve them well at Oberlin and in their lives outside the college.  Instructor: N. Boutilier

Writing Courses for Students Beyond the First Year

Rhetoric and Composition courses at the 200-level are intended for students beyond the first year who are interested in improving their writing skills. Issues in disciplinary discourses and composing and revising for a range of writing tasks are emphasized through frequent writing assignments, class discussions, and writing workshops. First-year students may enroll in these courses only by special consent of the instructor.

  • RHET 201 - Writing in the Sciences
    A course designed for students interested in developing their composing/revising skills for writing in natural science and mathematics disciplines or interpreting science topics for readers of general science issues. Instructor: J. Cooper
  • RHET 301 - Seminar in Scholarly Writing
    Intended as a capstone experience in the liberal arts, this course will enable seniors and second-semester juniors pursuing diverse majors to work in a common atmosphere. Through presentations and workshops focused on the drafts and revisions of their papers, students will learn from and teach each other about the rhetorical aspects of writing in their scholarly areas.We will explore-and attempt to consider critically-the history, epistemology, ethics, and rhetorical conventions of pertinent disciplinary discourses. Instructor: L. Podis
  • RHET 303 - Writing about Travel
    Students returning from study abroad are often asked: ‘How was Peru/London/Tibet/Zanzibar?’ Frequently, after such students have replied ‘fine,’ ‘great,’ or ‘really tough,’ the conversation stops. How might students make sense of their journeys? How might we fashion our travels into coherent and compelling writing? This course creates a community of writers and travelers in which we will both read and create various genres of writing about travel. Instructor: L. McMillin
  • RHET 305 - Grant and Fellowship Proposal Writing
    Sooner or later many professionals need to apply for grants. This course covers the basics of writing grant proposals or fellowship applications and researching funding sources. Students will learn to use the Cleveland Foundation Center’s database and work on a proposal to fund a community-based project or fellowship proposal in their area of interest. Instruction includes individual attention to fundamental college-level writing skills. Especially useful for artists, scientists, and community activists.  Instructor: J. Cooper
  • RHET 401 - Teaching and Tutoring Writing Across the Disciplines
    A course in which students will tutor at the writing center or assist one of the writing-intensive courses offered in various disciplines while studying composition theory and pedagogy. In the process of helping to educate others, students work toward a fuller understanding of their own educational experiences, particularly in writing.   Instructor: L. Podis

Practica

These courses offer students a chance to gain practical experience in writing either by working with an approved student publication or by developing a grant or fellowship application.

  • RTCP 107 - Practicum in Journalism
    Through this course students earn academic credit working for an approved journalistic publication on campus. The course does not meet as a class, but students are expected to attend all required staff meetings and fulfill the assignments made by their editors. Students can earn a maximum of four hours credit toward graduation (a maximum of six hours credit for editors).  Instructor: J. Cooper
  • RTCP 308 - Fellowship Writing
    This course is for students interested in writing applications for awards committees. Sessions will combine discussions of successful applications, in-class tutorials, and limited lecturing. We will focus more on editing than on generating a first draft. To that end, students can expect to apply several critical methodologies to their materials including those from literary theory, theories of visual design, and logic. Those interested in Watson, Fulbright, or major UK awards are especially encouraged to enroll. P/NP grading. Instructor: N. Petzak