Rhetoric and Composition
Contact
Department Chair:
Laurie McMillin

Administrative Assistant:
Linda Pardee

Department Email:


Phone: (440) 775-8907
Fax: (440) 775-8619

Location:
King Building 139
10 N. Professor St.
Oberlin, OH, 44074

Writing Center

Writing Center

Writing associates are trained to provide assistance with all stages of the writing process, from the selection of the topic through final editing. They can help the writer define an appropriate topic, develop research strategies, organize material, analyze drafts for strengths and weaknesses, revise, edit, and so forth. Please note that it is best to consult with a writing associate as early as possible in the writing process for a given assignment. Last minute consultations are usually less effective.

All writers, from basic to advanced, are encouraged to make use of the writing associate program. No appointment is necessary, and there is no charge for the service.

Fall 2014 Schedule 

Located in Mudd 101A (in the Academic Commons)

The Writing Center opens each semester on the Sunday at the start of the third week of classes and remains open through the last day of reading period.  The Writing Center is closed at the following times:  fall break, spring break, Thanksgiving break, exam periods, Winter Term, and summer.

Monday - Thursday: 7:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.
Sunday 2:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.
Closed: Friday & Saturday

Hours Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
2:00pm - 3:00pm Chase
Travis
Weelic
3:00pm - 4:00pm Chase
Travis
Weelic
4:00pm - 5:00pm Owain
Eliot
5:00pm - 6:00pm
Owain
Elon

6:00pm - 7:00pm
Edmund
Elon

7:00pm - 8:00pm Edmund
Justine
Athena
Sarita
Travis
Edmund
Travis
Sarita
Travis
Edmund
Elon
8:00pm - 9:00pm Lydia
Talia
Athena
Lydia
Sarita
Talia
Edmund
Travis
Talia
Lydia
Sarita
Travis
Edmund
Shulamite
Elon
9:00pm - 10:00pm

Lydia
Shulamite
Talia

Lydia
Talia
Felicia
Sarita
Hannah
Talia
Lydia
Chase
Felicia
Shulamite
Justine
Eliot
10:00pm - 11:00pm Hannah
Elon
Eliot
Athena
Justine
Chase
Felicia
Sarita
Owain
Hannah
Athena
Owain
Chase
Felicia
Shulamite
Hannah
Eliot
11:00pm - 12:00am
Hannah
Elon
Eliot
Athena
Chase
Felicia

Owain
Athena

Owain
Felicia
Hannah
Eliot
 

Student Information

Want to be tutored, but have no idea what a tutoring session will be like? Drop by the Writing Center and look through the files of report forms to get a general idea of how a tutoring session works.

One of the many resources available in the Writing Center (Mudd 101A) is the file of past writing associate report forms. These forms were filled out by past writing associates, dating back to Fall 2000, and they provide specific information about individual tutoring sessions. The forms are filed by department (i.e. English, Politics, Economics) in the yellow box on the bookcase.

What happens in a tutoring conference?

You, the tutee, ultimately determine what happens in a tutoring conference. Writing associates work with the goals, priorities, and strengths of each individual student. Sessions can include everything from scanning for grammar to discussing larger issues like organizing ideas, figuring out whether arguments make sense, or coming up with topics.

Many writing associates begin by asking you to read your paper aloud. After that, the writing associate will probably ask if you had any specific concerns about the paper and the session will go from there. The best tutoring sessions tend to be informal conversations about your paper and your ideas.

What should I do to prepare for my tutoring conference?

These tips may help you to get more out of tutoring conferences:

  • Bring a copy of the paper assignment your professor gave you (or at least be able to describe it).
  • You might also want to bring an extra copy of your paper for the writing associate to read and write on. By the way, feel free to come in without a paper if you want to discuss topics or general ideas.
  • Read your paper a few minutes before the conference. If it's fresh in your mind, it will be easier to talk about.
  • Think of questions to ask or problems to discuss. Here are three common questions to get you started:
    1. What do you think the paper says? How would you describe the main idea?
    2. What are the strengths of the paper?
    3. What are the weaknesses? Do you have any suggestions for improvement?
  • Try to leave yourself plenty of time for revision after the conference.
  • Try not to take the writing associate's comments as an insult or a personal criticism. If a suggestion seems wrong to you, try asking the writing associate to explain why s/he made it. In the end, you are free to accept or reject anything the writing associate says. It's your writing.