Sociology
Contact
Department Chair:
Daphne John, Chair

Administrative Assistant:
Judi Davidson

Department Email:


Phone: 440 7758370
Fax: 440 7758644

Location:
King 305
10 N. Professor St.
Oberlin, OH, 44074-1095

Office Hours: 730-400

Julie Keller's courses

Julie Keller's courses

108.  Introduction to Sociology: Investigating the Social World  4 Credits
4SS
This course analyzes im/migration as it is shaped by globalization. We will begin with classical understandings of citizenship, belonging and homeland connections. Then we will examine im/migrant communities around the world using a transnational migration lens, and attending to the intersections of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual identity. Places, spaces, liminality and crossings will be dominant themes. Historical texts, ethnography, and film will guide our exploration.  Enrollment Limit: 30

227.  Sociology of Gender
- 4 credits
4SS, CD
In this course we will analyze how gender organizes and shapes our everyday lives. Drawing from classical and contemporary works, we will examine a range of theoretical approaches to studying our gendered world from a sociological perspective. Analysis of masculinities and femininities will figure prominantly, as well as contemporary issues such as the gender pay gap, queer families, and challenges to the gender binary.  Enrollment Limit: 30

342.  Immigration and Globalization: Spaces, Places and Crossings 4 Credits
4SS, CD
This course analyzes im/migration as it is shaped by globalization. We will begin with classical understandings of citizenship, belonging and homeland connections. Then we will examine im/migrant communities around the world using a transnational migration lens, and attending to the intersections of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual identity. Places, spaces, liminality and crossings will be dominant themes. Historical texts, ethnography, and film will guide our exploration.  Enrollment Limit: 30

414.  Seminar in Rural Sociology: "Rednecks", Cowboys, and Country Queers 
4 Credits
4SS, CD
This seminar examines rural American life using a cultural lens. How are symbolic boundaries drawn, reinforced, or dissolved in response to identities and practices in rural places? Drawing from the interdisciplinary field of rural studies, this course investigates the cultural meanings of community, isolation, and exclusion in rural America. Topics include: rural “others,” queers in the countryside, urban readings of the rural, “rural chic” trends, and deconstructing “white trash.” Open to sociology and non-sociology majors. Fieldtrip required.  Enrollment Limit:  12